The 1905 church was a frame building with weatherboarding and cost approximately $4000 to construct. It was built, for the most part, by local congregation members. This church had a tall steeple that housed a bell which was donated by one of the lifetime members. A few of the interior accommodations were transferred from the old building, some were factory-made, but most were hand-built by parishioners.

The old foot-pedal organ was moved from the previous building and remained in use until the early 1920’s when it was replaced by a piano (which was the trend in most churches at the time). By 1953, when organs came back into vogue, a beautiful Hammond electric organ was donated to the church by one of the members.

Montgomery Church circa 1930

In 1926, Potomac Edison ran electricity to the city of Damascus and, shortly thereafter, the church was wired and electric lights were installed. This was a great upgrade from the old kerosene chandeliers which provided very poor illumination. Electricity was also used to help upgrade the heating system from the old hot air coal furnace.

In 1941, the church was given a facelift. The Sunday school rooms were enlarged, a brick facing was added and the steeple was removed (a popular trend at the time), leaving the belfry open. About this time, the “his” and “hers” outhouses were replaced with indoor plumbing!

Montgomery Church After the Facelift

In 1959, a basement was added under the church and was divided into Sunday school rooms. In 1960, the bell tower was heighted and a canopy was added to protect the bell from the weather.

During the tenure of this church, we also witnessed the largest unification movement in American Protestantism when, in 1939, The Southern Episcopal Methodist Church, The Episcopal Methodist Church and The Methodist Protestant Church combined to form The Methodist Church. Then, in 1968, The Methodist Church and The Evangelical United Brethren merged to form the United Methodist Church. Thus, we adopted the name of Montgomery United Methodist Church.

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